Curriculum

Essential elements in the PYP

The five essential elements of the PYP are:

  • knowledge, which is both disciplinary, represented by traditional subject areas (language, maths, science, social studies, arts, PSPE) and transdisciplinary
  • concepts, which students explore through structured inquiry in order to develop coherent, in-depth understanding, and which have relevance both within and beyond subject areas
  • skills, which are the broad capabilities students develop and apply during learning and in life beyond the classroom
  • attitudes, which contribute to international-mindedness and the wellbeing of individuals and learning communities, and connect directly to the IB learner profile
  • action, which is an expectation in the PYP that successful inquiry leads to responsible, thoughtful and appropriate action.

Units of Inquiry

The PYP programme defines transdisciplinary themes that identify areas of shared human experience and have meaning for individuals from different cultures and ethnicities. They provide the opportunity to incorporate both local and global issues in the knowledge component of the PYP written curriculum—what we want students to know about.

These units integrate subject knowledge across the main curriculum areas of languages, mathematics, social studies, science and technology, the arts, and personal, physical and social education (PSPE).

There are six transdisciplinary themes.

  • Who we are
  • Where we are in place and time
  • How we express ourselves
  • How the world works
  • How we organize ourselves
  • Sharing the planet

Attitudes: what do we want students to feel, value and demonstrate?

PYP Attitudes are dispositions that are expressions of fundamental values, beliefs and feelings about learning, the environment and people.

  • Appreciation: Appreciating the wonder and beauty of the world and its people.
  • Commitment: Being committed to their own learning, persevering and showing selfdiscipline and responsibility.
  • Confidence: Feeling confident in their ability as learners, having the courage to take risks, applying what they have learned and making appropriate decisions and choices.
  • Cooperation: Cooperating, collaborating, and leading or following as the situation demands.
  • Creativity: Being creative and imaginative in their thinking and in their approach to problems and dilemmas.
  • Curiosity: Being curious about the nature of learning, about the world, its people and cultures.
  • Empathy: Imagining themselves in another’s situation in order to understand his or her reasoning and emotions, so as to be open-minded and reflective about the perspectives of others.
  • Enthusiasm: Enjoying learning and willingly putting the effort into the process.
  • Independence: Thinking and acting independently, making their own judgments based on reasoned argument, and being able to defend their judgments.
  • Integrity: Being honest and demonstrating a considered sense of fairness.
  • Respect: Respecting themselves, others and the world around them.
  • Tolerance: Being sensitive about differences and diversity in the world and being responsive to the needs of others.